A Growing Problem!

A story of Reverse Ossification occurring in the pelvis

Christine Penn

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Photo by Lubo Minar on Unsplash

A tiny little seedling growing in a crevasse can split even the hardest rocks in the world. That is an example of the power of nature from even the smallest of things. (See this for more info on how this happens.)

If you haven’t kept up with my ongoing saga with this, here is the background

I had a bad fall on a gravel bike on a rail trail near my house that included what was likely a one in a million type of injury, followed up by several one in a million types of situations that have occurred during recovery.

(This next part is partially supposition, however, it is based on observations of the results of the injuries sustained in the accident that became more apparent later.)

The initial fall included a face down position centering the body over the left side of the handlebars, where the left drop bar end struck my left labia (as evident from the perfect circular hematoma and the area of soreness that showed up a couple days after the accident while still in the hospital — eventually the whole labia would turn black). Shortly after this initial hit, the bar end then slid into the vaginal canal eventually coming to rest against the right ischium (as evidence by the two bone fractures on the right ischium, separated by the distance of the width of the bar — you can see the healing of these fractures in several of the pictures shown later). Despite this stoppage, the force applied was still significant enough to continue and push the right pelvic bone outwards, completely tearing the superior pubic ligament. Minor hairline fractures and tears were also later observed in the upper area around the sacroiliac joints (my surgeon called it butterflying the pelvis).

Some minor vaginal canal tearing became apparent later, and an area of acute soreness associated within the vaginal canal around the area of the pelvic bone impact site was also later felt. (Notice how I keep on mentioning “several days later”. This is because initially the entire area in general was wrought with pain, so it was hard to pinpoint what pain stemmed from where. Over time, these became more clear.)

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Christine Penn

Trans woman, parent, cyclist, software engineer, author, chef, and many other things.